Psychological Autopsy Study Comparing Suicide Decedents, Suicide Ideators, and Propensity Score Matched Controls: Results from the Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Service Members (Army STARRS)

Publication Name: 
Psychological Medicine
Publication Authors: 
Nock MK, Dempsey CL, Aliaga PA, Brent DA, Heeringa SG, Kessler RC, Stein MB, Ursano RJ, Benedek D
Date of Publication: 
May 2017

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The suicide rate has increased significantly among US Army soldiers over the past decade. Here we report the first results from a large psychological autopsy study using two control groups designed to reveal risk factors for suicide death among soldiers beyond known sociodemographic factors and the presence of suicide ideation.

METHODS:

Informants were next-of-kin and Army supervisors for: 135 suicide cases, 137 control soldiers propensity-score-matched on known sociodemographic risk factors for suicide and Army history variables, and 118 control soldiers who reported suicide ideation in the past year.

RESULTS:

Results revealed that most (79.3%) soldiers who died by suicide have a prior mental disorder; mental disorders in the prior 30-days were especially strong risk factors for suicide death. Approximately half of suicide decedents tell someone that they are considering suicide. Virtually all of the risk factors identified in this study differed between suicide cases and propensity-score-matched controls, but did not significantly differ between suicide cases and suicide ideators. The most striking difference between suicides and ideators was the presence in the former of an internalizing disorder (especially depression) and multi-morbidity (i.e. 3+ disorders) in the past 30 days.

CONCLUSIONS:

Most soldiers who die by suicide have identifiable mental disorders shortly before their death and tell others about their suicidal thinking, suggesting that there are opportunities for prevention and intervention. However, few risk factors distinguish between suicide ideators and decedents, pointing to an important direction for future research.

KEYWORDS:

military; psychological autopsy; suicidal; suicide

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